Top American Icons - The Story of America

American Patriotism Success in America Logo
American Pride Logo George Washington Crossing Delaware Freedom Vets Day Veterans Day November 2009 The Alamo San Antonio Texas Rough Riders San Juan Hill Roosevelt Reagan Bush Gorbachev Statue of Liberty
  • Yahoo Answers Logo
  • Facebook Logo
  • Twitter Logo
  • Youtube Logo
StoriesofUSA@gmail.com

"We commend you for your efforts to develop and improve access to high-quality history education resources that will
enhance the teaching and learning of history in schools across this nation"
- US Department of Education

  • American Patriotism Stories of USA Home Icon
  • Abraham Lincoln Icon
  • Liberty Bell Icon
  • US Flag American Patriotism Icon
  • Dream 2 Achieve Children Success
  • Success in America
  • Behind the Red, White and Blue Icon
HELP PRESERVE
AMERICA'S HERITAGE
Donate Now Button


RANDY E KING BIO
BEST-SELLING AUTHOR


Book Now Best Public Speaker Randy E King "History can show us where we do or do not want to go."


Dream 2 Achieve
Available August 2016


Dream 2 Achieve Book Cover
"Leadership is about standing out from the masses while being an example for them."


Leading America
Published June 2015


Leading America Book Cover
"Authentic leaders are given what they deserve by others through selfless acts."


Duplicitous
Published August 2014


Duplicitous Book Cover
"Our true enemy is ignorance & apathy."


IS ANYBODY LISTENING?
Real Teens - True Stories


Is Anybody Listening Book Cover "Raising teenagers is like trying to nail Jell-O to a tree."




Left Center Right What is Best for America Book Cover "He who knows nothing is closer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors."


BUY AMERICAN PRIDE CD
American Pride CD mp3 Digital Download

Archive for the ‘Top American Icons’ Category

The Great Seal of the United States of America

The Great Seal of the United States of America Front Clip ArtOn July 4, 1776, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were given the task of creating a seal for the United States of America. The Great Seal of the United States of America was finalized and approved on June 20, 1782. The seal reflects the beliefs and values that the Founding Fathers wanted to pass on to future generations of American citizens.

In the center of the seal is an bald eagle, the US national bird. It holds in its beak a scroll inscribed – E PLURIBUS UNIM – which in Latin means “out of many, one” and stands for one nation that was created from many colonies and personal backgrounds. In one claw is an olive branch, in the other is a bundle of 13 arrows. The olive branch and arrows represent the power of peace and war.

A shield with 13 red and white stripes covers the eagle’s breast. The shield is supported solely by the American eagle to denote that Americans should rely on their own virtue. The red and white stripes of the shield represent the states united under and supporting the blue, representing an elected federal Government. The color white represents purity and innocence. Red represents hardiness and valor. Blue represents vigilance, perseverance and justice. Above the eagle’s head is a cloud surrounding a blue field containing 13 stars, which forms a constellation. The constellation denotes that a new Nation is taking its place among other nations. 13 represents the first 13 states: Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia.

The Great Seal of the United States of America Back Clip ArtThe Great Seal of the United States of America’s reverse side contains a 13-step pyramid with the year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) in Roman numerals at the base. At the top of the pyramid is the Eye of Providence and above is the motto – ANNUIT COEPTIS – which in Latin means “It [the Eye of Providence] is favorable to our undertakings” or “He favors our undertakings.” Below the pyramid, a scroll reads – NOVUS ORDO SECLORUM – which in Latin means “New Order of the Ages.” It refers to 1776 as the beginning of the new era of the American nation.

The Great Seal of the United States of America can be seen on the back of a $1 bill. The Secretary of State is the official custodian of the seal. It is only affixed to certain documents, such as foreign treaties and presidential proclamations. The Great Seal of the USA is displayed in the Exhibit Hall of the Department of State, in Washington, DC.

Monticello VA Thomas Jefferson Home

Monticello VA Thomas Jefferson Home

931 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy
Charlottesville, VA 22902

Monticello VA Thomas Jefferson Estate

Monticello is a National Historic Landmark just outside Charlottesville, Virginia. It was the home and burial place of Thomas Jefferson, the principal author of the United States Declaration of Independence, 3rd President of the United States and founder of the University of Virginia.

The house, which Thomas Jefferson designed, was based on the neoclassical principles described in the books of the Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio. It is situated on the summit of an 850′ peak in the Southwest Mountains. Its name means “Little Mountain.”

Monticello used to appear on the reverse side of the $2 bill, until it was replaced by an engraved modified reproduction of the Declaration of Independence.

Monticello, along with the nearby University of Virginia, also designed by Jefferson, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monticello

US Historical Icons

US Historical Icons:

The Alamo – San Antonio, TX – Daughters of the Republic of Texas

The Alamo – San Antonio, TX – Daughters of the Republic of Texas

The Alamo
300 Alamo Plaza
San Antonio, TX 78205
(210) 225-1391
Open Mon-Sat 9am-5:30pm; Sun 10am-5:30pm

The Alamo San Antonio TX

More than 2.5 million people a year visit “The Alamo.” They come to see the old mission where a small band of Texans held out for 13 days against the army of General Antonio López de Santa Anna. Although the Alamo fell in the early morning hours of March 6, 1836, the death of the Alamo Defenders has come to symbolize courage and sacrifice for the cause of Liberty. The memories of James Bowie, David Crockett and William B. Travis are as powerful today as when the Texan Army under Sam Houston shouted “Remember the Alamo!” as it routed Santa Anna at the battle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836. The Alamo has been managed by the Daughters of the Republic of Texas since 1905. Located on Alamo Plaza in downtown San Antonio, Texas, the Alamo represents nearly 300 years of history. Three buildings – the Shrine, Long Barrack Museum and Gift Museum – house exhibits on the Texas Revolution and Texas History. Visitors are welcome to stroll through the beautiful Alamo Gardens. Just a short distance from the River Walk, the Alamo is a “must see” for all who come to San Antonio.

Click here to Learn about the Battle of the Alamo

Source: http://www.thealamo.org/

Free American Patriotic Songs, Lyrics & Videos, Glad Im Livin In The USA, National Anthem, America the Beautiful, God Bless America, Coming to America, The Battle Hymn of the Republic, God Bless the USA

Free American Patriotic Songs, Lyrics & Videos

Glad I’m Livin’ In The USA – Doug Ferony – Stories of USA Theme Song

Glad I’m Livin’ in the USA
Got a lot of Fine Reasons for Livin’ in the USA
Glad I’m Livin’ in the USA
We Got the Blue Ridge Mountains in the USA
We Got the California Coastline Livin’ in the USA
Got Heartland Livin’ in the USA
We Got the Grand Canyon in the USA
We Got the Mighty Mississippi Livin’ in the USA
We Got New York City Livin’ in the USA
We Got New England States in the USA
Coast to Coast it’s Called the USA
Our Brave Forefathers Founded the USA
American Dream Livin’ in the USA
It’s My Country Lovin’ This USA
Glad I’m Livin’ in the USA

Glad I’m Livin’ in the USA
A Lot of Fine Reasons for Livin’ in the USA
Glad I’m Livin’ in the USA
Got Down Home Cooking in the USA
Got Philly Cheesesteaks in the USA
Got Texas Tacos in the USA
Got New York Pizza in the USA
Got Great Sports Teams Playin’ in the USA
Got NASCAR Racin’ in the USA
We Got the Best Armed Forces Fightin’ for the USA
Fight for Freedom Livin’ in the USA
God Bless My Country It’s Called the USA
We Got Donald Trump Livin’ in the USA
We Got the Laker Girls Livin’ in the USA
We Got Mohammed Ali Livin’ in the USA
We Got Lady of Liberty Livin’ in the USA
We Got Stars and Stripes Livin’ in the USA
We Got the Home of the Brave Livin’ in the USA
We Got American Spirit Livin’ in the USA
Take Me Home Lovin’ This USA
Glad I’m Livin’ in the USA


Alternative The Star Spangled Banner Video

The Star Spangled Banner Lyrics & Video – The Cactus Cuties – The National Anthem of the USA
Texas Tech vs Texas Basketball Game – January 20, 2008

Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn’s early light,
What so proudly we hail’d at the twilight’s last gleaming?
Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro’ the perilous fight,
O’er the ramparts we watch’d, were so gallantly streaming?
And the rockets’ red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof thro’ the night that our flag was still there.
O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep,
Where the foe’s haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze, o’er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning’s first beam,
In full glory reflected now shines in the stream:
‘Tis the star-spangled banner! Oh long may it wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion,
A home and a country should leave us no more!
Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps’ pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave:
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
Between their loved home and the war’s desolation!
Blest with victory and peace, may the heav’n rescued land
Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation.
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto: “In God is our trust.”
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

Whitney Houston – National Anthem – Super Bowl 1991


America The Beautiful Lyrics & Video – Ray Charles Live – The McCallum Theater – 1991

O beautiful for heroes proved
In liberating strife.
Who more than self their country loved
And mercy more than life!
America! America!
May God thy gold refine
Till all success be nobleness
And every gain divine!

O beautiful for spacious skies,
For amber waves of grain,
For purple mountain majesties
Above the fruited plain!
America! America!
God shed his grace on thee
And crown thy good with brotherhood
From sea to shining sea!


God Bless America Lyrics & Video – Martina McBride Live
Tournament of Roses Parade Pasadena CA – January 1, 2002

God Bless America,
Land that I love.
Stand beside her, and guide her
Thru the night with a light from above.
From the mountains, to the prairies,
To the oceans, white with foam
God bless America, My home sweet home.


Coming To America Lyrics & Video – Neil Diamond
Jazz Singer (movie) – 1980

Far
We’ve been traveling far
Without a home
But not without a star

Free
Only want to be free
We huddle close
Hang on to a dream

On the boats and on the planes
They’re coming to America
Never looking back again
They’re coming to America

Home, don’t it seem so far away
Oh, we’re traveling light today
In the eye of the storm
In the eye of the storm

Home, to a new and a shiny place
Make our bed, and we’ll say our grace
Freedom’s light burning warm
Freedom’s light burning warm

Everywhere around the world
They’re coming to America
Every time that flag’s unfurled
They’re coming to America

Got a dream to take them there
They’re coming to America
Got a dream they’ve come to share
They’re coming to America

They’re coming to America
They’re coming to America
They’re coming to America
They’re coming to America
Today, today, today, today, today

My country ’tis of thee (Today)
Sweet land of liberty (today)
Of thee I sing (today)
Of thee I sing (today)

(today) (today) (today)


Alternative The Battle Hymn of the Republic Video

The Battle Hymn of the Republic Lyrics & Video

Mine eyes have seen the glory
Of the coming of the Lord;
He is trampling out the vintage
Where the grapes of wrath are stor’d;
He hath loos’d the fateful lightning
Of His terrible swift sword:
His truth is marching on.
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His truth is marching on.

I have seen Him in the watchfires
Of a hundred circling camps,
They have builded Him an altar
In the evening dews and damps;
I can read His righteous sentence
By the dim and flaring lamps:
His truth is marching on.
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His truth is marching on.

In the beauty of the lilies
Christ was born across the sea,
With a glory in His bosom
That transfigures you and me;
As He died to make men holy
Let us die to make men free,
While God is marching on.
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His truth is marching on.


God Bless the USA Lyrics & Video – Lee Greenwood

If tomorrow all the things were gone
I’d worked for all my life,
And I had to start a new one
with just my children and my wife,
I’d thank my lucky stars
to be living here today,
‘Cause the flag still stands for freedom
and they can’t take that away.

And I’m proud to be an American
where at least I know I’m free,
And I won’t forget the men who died
who gave that right to me,
And I gladly stand up next to you
and defend her still today,
‘Cause there ain’t no doubt I love this land
God Bless the U.S.A.

From the lakes of Minnesota
to the hills of Tennessee,
Across the plains of Texas
from sea to shining sea.
From Detroit down to Houston
and New York to L.A.,
well There’s pride in every American heart
and it’s time we stand and say:

that I’m proud to be an American
where at least I know I’m free,
And I won’t forget the men who died
who gave that right to me,
And I gladly stand up next to you
and defend her still today,
‘Cause there ain’t no doubt I love this land
God Bless the U.S.A.

And I’m proud to be an American
where at least I know I’m free,
And I won’t forget the men who died
who gave that right to me,
And I gladly stand up next to you
and defend her still today,
‘Cause there ain’t no doubt I love this land
God Bless the U.S.A.


Other Popular Historical, Military, Motivational and Patriotic Songs about America:

Far East Movement
Rocketeer
Glee Cast
Empire State Of Mind
Zac Brown Band
Free
Lady Antebellum
American Honey
Justin Moore
Small Town USA
Toby Keith
American Ride
Miley Cyrus
Party In The U.S.A.
Zac Brown Band
Chicken Fried
Carrie Underwood
All-American Girl
Aaron Tippin
Stars, Stripes, Eagle Fly
Lee Ann Womack
I Hope You Dance
Kenny G
Auld Lang Syne
Madonna
American Pie
Will Smith
Wild Wild West
Vanessa Williams
Colors Of The Wind
Joe Public
Live And Learn
Billy Joel
We Didn’t Start The Fire
John Cougar Mellencamp
R.O.C.K. In The U.S.A.
James Brown
Living In America
Bruce Springsteen
Born In The U.S.A.
The Charlie Daniels Band
In America
Linda Ronstadt
Back In The U.S.A.
Byron MacGregor
Americans
Bette Midler
Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy
SSgt. Barry Sadler
Ballad Of Green Berets
Jimmy Dean
P.T. 109
Johnny Horton
Battle Of New Orleans
Bill Hayes
Ballad Of Davy Crockett
Vaughn Monroe
Old Soldiers Never Die
The Andrews Sisters
She Wore Yellow Ribbon

Apollo 11 Moon Landing Video, Neil Armstrong, We Choose to Go to the Moon, JFK – July 20, 1969

Apollo 11 Moon Landing Video, Neil Armstrong, We Choose to Go to the Moon, JFK – July 20, 1969

Apollo 11 Moon Landing

The human race has had a total of twelve people walk on the Moon. This was accomplished with two US pilot-astronauts flying a Lunar Module on each of six NASA missions across a 41-month time span starting on July 20, 1969, with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on Apollo 11 (with Armstrong being first to step foot on the surface), and ending on December 14, 1972 with Gene Cernan and Jack Schmitt on Apollo 17 (with Cernan being the last to step off the lunar surface). No other country other than the USA has sent a person to walk on the moon.

Liberty Bell (Pass and Stow), Independence Hall, Philadelphia PA

Liberty Bell, Independence Hall: Philadelphia PA

500 Chestnut St
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Phone: 215-597-8787

Independence Hall and Liberty Bell

The Declaration of Independence and US Constitution were signed at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, PA, in 1776. On July 8, 1776, the Liberty Bell, made by John Pass & John Stow (Pass and Stow) was rung to summon people for the reading of the Declaration of Independence.

It was cast in London, England. It cracked soon after it arrived in Philadelphia. Pass and Stow cast a new bell in 1753, using metal from the English bell. Their names appear on the front of the bell, along with the city and the date. By 1846 a thin crack began to affect the sound of the bell. The bell was repaired in 1846 and rang for a George Washington birthday celebration, but the bell cracked again and has not been rung since.

The bell weighs about 2000 pounds. It is made of 70% copper, 25% tin, and small amounts of lead, zinc, arsenic, gold and silver. It hangs from what is believed to be its original yoke, made from American elm, also known as slippery elm.

Liberty Bell Map Independence HallThe Bell’s Message

The Liberty Bell’s inscription conveys a message of liberty. In 1751, the Speaker of the Pennsylvania Assembly ordered a new bell for the State House. He asked that a Bible verse to be placed on the bell – “Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the Land unto all the inhabitants thereof” (Leviticus 25:10). As the official bell of the Pennsylvania State House (today called Independence Hall) it rang many times for public announcements.

The old State House bell was first called the “Liberty Bell” by a group trying to outlaw slavery. These abolitionists remembered the words on the bell and, in the 1830s, adopted it as a symbol of their cause. Beginning in the late 1800s, the Liberty Bell traveled around the country to expositions and fairs to help heal the divisions of the Civil War.

Visiting the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall

The Liberty Bell Center is located on Market Street between 5th and 6th Streets, in Philadelphia, PA. The building is open year round, though hours vary by season. The Liberty Bell itself is displayed in a magnificent glass chamber with Independence Hall in the background.

John F Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center Complex, NASA, Cape Canaveral FL

John F Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center Complex, NASA, Cape Canaveral FL

Kennedy Space Center Florida

The John F. Kennedy Space Center is the U.S. government installation that manages and operates America’s astronaut launch facilities. Serving as the base for the country’s space shuttles, the NASA field center also conducts unmanned civilian launches from adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. It has been the launch site for every U.S. human space flight since 1968. Its iconic Vehicle Assembly Building is the fourth-largest structure in the world by volume.

Located on Merritt Island, Florida, the center is north-northwest of Cape Canaveral on the Atlantic Ocean, midway between Miami and Jacksonville on Florida’s Space Coast. It is 34 miles (55 km) long and roughly 6 miles (10 km) wide, covering 219 square miles (570 km2). A total of 13,500 people worked at the center as of 2008.

Arlington National Cemetery, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

Arlington National Cemetery, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

Arlington National Cemetery
214 McNair Road
Arlington, VA 22211
(703) 607-8000

Arlington National Cemetery

The mansion, which was intended as a living memorial to George Washington, was owned and constructed by the first president’s adopted grandson, George Washington Parke Custis, son of John Parke Custis who himself was a child of Martha Washington by her first marriage and a ward of George Washington. Arlington won out as a name over Mount Washington, which is what George Washington Parke Custis first intended calling the 1,100-acre tract of land that he had inherited at the death of his father when he was 3.

The north wing was the first structure completed in 1802. It was in this building that Custis made his home, with a significant portion of it used to store George Washington memorabilia Custis was acquiring with regularity. Among the items purchased and stored in the north wing were portraits, Washington’s personal papers and clothes, and the command tent which the president had used at Yorktown.

George Washington Parke Custis and his wife, Mary Lee Fitzhugh (whom he had married in 1804), lived in Arlington House for the rest of their lives and were buried together on the property after their deaths in 1857 and 1853, respectively. They are buried in their original graves in Section 13, at map grid N-30. On June 30, 1831, Custis’ only child, Mary Anna Randolph Custis, married her childhood friend and distant cousin, Robert E. Lee. Lee was the son of former three-term Virginia Governor Henry (“Light Horse Harry”) Lee and was himself a graduate of West Point.

Between 1841 and 1857, Lee was away from Arlington House for several extended periods. In 1846 he served in the Mexican war under Gen. Winfield Scott, and in 1852 he was appointed superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, his alma mater. After his father-in-law died in 1857, Lee returned to Arlington to join his family and to serve as executor of the estate.

Under the terms of her father’s will, Mary Anna Custis Lee was given the right to inhabit and control the house for the rest of her life. Custis’ will also stipulated that upon Mary Anna’s death, full title would pass to her eldest son, George Washington Custis Lee. Contrary to popular belief, Robert E. Lee never owned the Arlington estate. Lee did serve as custodian of the property, which had fallen into disrepair by the time he returned to execute his father-in-law’s will. By 1859, Lee had returned the property and its holdings to profitability and good order.

Robert E. Lee and his wife, Mary Anna, lived at Arlington House until 1861, when Virginia ratified an alliance with the Confederacy and seceded from the Union

Arlington National Cemetery was established by Brig. Gen. Montgomery C. Meigs, who commanded the garrison at Arlington House, appropriated the grounds June 15, 1864, for use as a military cemetery. His intention was to render the house uninhabitable should the Lee family ever attempt to return. A stone and masonry burial vault in the rose garden, 20 feet wide and 10 feet deep, and containing the remains of 1,800 Bull Run casualties, was among the first monuments to Union dead erected under Meigs’ orders. Meigs himself was later buried within 100 yards of Arlington House with his wife, father and son; the final statement to his original order.

Neither Robert E. Lee, nor his wife, as title holder, ever attempted to publicly recover control of Arlington House. They were buried at Washington University (later renamed Washington and Lee University) where Lee had served as president. The couple never returned to the home George Washington Parke Custis had built and treasured. After Gen. Lee’s death in 1870, George Washington Custis Lee brought an action for ejectment in the Circuit Court of Alexandria (today Arlington) County, Va. Custis Lee, as eldest son of Gen. and Mrs. Lee, claimed that the land had been illegally confiscated and that, according to his grandfather’s will, he was the legal owner. In December 1882, the U.S. Supreme Court, in a 5-4 decision, returned the property to Custis Lee, stating that it had been confiscated without due process

On March 3, 1883, the Congress purchased the property from Lee for $150,000. It became a military reservation, and Freedman’s Village, but not the graves, was removed.

Source: http://www.arlingtoncemetery.org/historical_information/arlington_house.html

Washington DC Attractions, Sightseeing, Museums, Memorials, Monuments

Washington DC Attractions, Sightseeing, Museums, Memorials, Monuments

Alternative Washington DC Attractions Video

Washington DC Monuments Map

Washington DC Monuments and Memorials:

African American Civil War Memorial and Museum
1200 U Street, NW.
A Wall of Honor lists the names of 209,145 United States Colored Troops (USCT) who served in the Civil War. The museum explores the African American struggle for freedom in the United States. Museum is open Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Arlington National Cemetery
Across the Memorial Bridge from DC
This is America’s largest burial ground with the graves of President John F. Kennedy, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, world champion boxer Joe Louis and the Tomb of the Unknowns. Hours are 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily.

DC War Memorial
National Mall, west of 17th St. and Independence Ave. SW.
This lesser known memorial commemorates the 26,000 citizens of Washington, DC who served in World War I. Funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 has been approved for $7.3 million to restore the memorial.

Eisenhower Memorial
Between 4th and 6th Streets SW.
Plans are underway to build a national memorial to honor President Dwight D. Eisenhower on a four-acre site near the National Mall. The memorial will feature a grove of oak trees, huge limestone columns, and a semicircular space made monolithic stone blocks and carvings and inscriptions that depict images of Eisenhower’s life.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial
West Potomac Park near Lincoln Memorial on Ohio Drive, SW
This memorial is divided into four outdoor galleries, one for each of FDR’s terms in office from 1933 to 1945. Several sculptures depict the 32nd President. Hours are 8 a.m. to 11:45 p.m.

George Mason Memorial
900 Ohio Drive, in East Potomac Park, SW.
Monument to the author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights, which inspired Thomas Jefferson while drafting the Declaration of Independence. Mason persuaded our forefathers to include individual rights as a part of the Bill of Rights.

Iwo Jima Memorial
Marshall Drive, next to Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia.
This memorial, also known as the United States Marine Corps War Memorial, is dedicated to the marines who gave their lives during one of the most historic battles of World War II, the battle of Iwo Jima.

Jefferson Memorial
15th Street, SW
This dome-shaped rotunda honors the nation’s third president. The 19-foot bronze statue of Jefferson is located on the Tidal Basin, surrounded by a grove of trees making it especially beautiful during Cherry Blossom season in the spring. Hours are 8 a.m. to midnight daily.

Korean War Veterans Memorial
Daniel French Drive and Independence Avenue, SW
Our nation honors those who were killed, captured, wounded or remain missing in action during the Korean War (1950 -1953). Nineteen figures represent every ethnic background. The statues are supported by a granite wall with 2,400 faces of land, sea and air support troops. A Pool of Remembrance lists the names of the lost Allied Forces. Hours are 8 a.m. to 11:45 p.m.

Lincoln Memorial
23rd Street between Constitution and Independence Avenues, NW
This memorial was dedicated in 1922 to honor President Abraham Lincoln. Thirty-eight Grecian columns surround a statue of Lincoln seated on a ten-foot high marble base. This impressive statue is surrounded by engraved readings of the Gettysburg address, his Second Inaugural address and murals by French painter Jules Guerin. Hours are 8 a.m. to midnight.

Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial
Tidal Basin, Washington, DC.
The memorial, which is currently under construction and is tentatively scheduled to be dedicated in 2011, memorial will honor Dr. King’s national and international contributions and vision for all to enjoy a life of freedom, opportunity, and justice. The centerpiece will be the “Stone of Hope”, a 30-foot statue of Dr. King, with a wall that will be inscribed with excerpts of his sermons and public addresses.

National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial
Judiciary Square at E Street, NW, between 4th and 5th Streets.
This monument honors the service and sacrifice of federal, state and local law enforcers. A marble wall is inscribed with the names of more than 17,000 officers who have been killed in the line of duty since the first known death in 1792. A Memorial Fund is campaigning to build the National Law Enforcement Museum underground, beneath the monument. They expect to break ground on this museum in 2008 and open its doors in 2011.

Pentagon Memorial
I-395 at Boundary Channel Drive, Washington DC. The memorial honors the 184 lives lost in the Pentagon and on American Airlines Flight 77 during the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The Memorial includes a park and gateway spanning approximately two acres.

Theodore Roosevelt Island
George Washington Memorial Parkway, Washington, DC.
A 91-acre wilderness preserve serves as a memorial to the nation’s 26th president, honoring his contributions to conservation of public lands for forests, national parks, wildlife and bird refuges, and monuments. The island has 2 1/2 miles of foot trails where you can observe a variety of flora and fauna. A 17-foot bronze statue of Roosevelt stands in the center of the island.

United States Air Force Memorial
One Air Force Memorial Drive, Arlington, Virginia.
This is the newest memorial in the Washington, DC area, completed in September 2006. The memorial honors the millions of men and women who have served in the United States Air Force. Open 24 hours.

U. S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, SW.
The museum serves as a memorial to the millions of people who were murdered during the Holocaust. Open 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. everyday, except Yom Kippur and Christmas Day. Timed passes are distributed on a first–come first–served basis.

United States Navy Memorial
at 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., between 7th and 9th Streets.
The memorial commemorates U. S. Naval history and honors all who have served in the sea services. Open 24 hours, Naval Heritage Center is open Mon. – Sat. 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Constitution Avenue and Henry Bacon Drive, NW
A V-shaped granite wall is inscribed with the names of the 58,209 Americans missing or killed in the Vietnam War. Across the lawn is a life size bronze sculpture of three young servicemen. Hours are 8 a.m. to 11:45 p.m.

Washington Monument
Constitution Avenue and 15th Street, NW.
The memorial to George Washington, our nation’s first president, took 40 years to complete its original construction due to lack of funds, but was finally dedicated in 1885. It has recently been refurbished to its original splendor. Take the elevator to the top and see a wonderful view of the city. For free tickets, go to the kiosk on the Washington Monument grounds at 15th Street and Madison Drive. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. daily except for December 25. Advance tickets are available for $1.50 service fee.

Women in Vietnam Memorial
Constitution Avenue and Henry Bacon Drive, NW.
This sculpture depicts three women in the military with a wounded soldier to honor the women who served in the Vietnam War. The sculpture was dedicated in 1993 as part of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

World War II Memorial
17th Street, between Constitution and Independence Avenues.
This beautiful structure serves as a peaceful place to remember those who served our country during World War II. The memorial is open 24 hours a day.

Source: http://dc.about.com/cs/sightseeing/a/Monuments.htm

911 Twin Towers Collapse Video, World Trade Center, WTC Ground Zero Museum & Memorial – September 11, 2001

911 Twin Towers Collapse Video, World Trade Center, WTC Ground Zero Museum & Memorial – September 11, 2001

** Warning – Parental Discretion Advised **

These videos follow YouTube guidelines. However, there are visual displays of war and acts of violence.

911 World Trade Center Memorial

The 911 World Trade Center Memorial is currently under construction. It is a memorial to those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001, when 4 airplanes crashed into the two Twin Towers in New York, the Pentagon, and an empty field in Pennsylvania.

The September 11, 2001, attacks (often referred to as September 11th or 9/11) were a series of coordinated suicide attacks by al-Qaeda upon the United States. 19 al-Qaeda terrorists hijacked four commercial passenger jet airliners. The hijackers intentionally crashed two of the airliners into the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, killing everyone on board and many others working in the buildings. Both buildings collapsed within two hours, destroying nearby buildings and damaging others. The hijackers crashed a third airliner into the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, just outside Washington, D.C. The fourth plane crashed into a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania after some of its passengers and flight crew attempted to retake control of the plane, which the hijackers had redirected toward Washington, D.C. There were no survivors from any of the flights. The death toll of the attacks was 2,996, including the 19 hijackers. The overwhelming majority of casualties were civilians, including nationals of over 70 countries.

The Pearl Harbor Attack & Bombing, USS Arizona Memorial – December 7, 1941

The Pearl Harbor Attack & Bombing, USS Arizona Memorial – December 7, 1941

USS Arizona Memorial Pearl Harbor Hawaii

The USS Arizona is the final resting place for many of the ship’s 1,177 crewmen who lost their lives on December 7, 1941. The 184-foot-long Memorial structure spanning the mid-portion of the sunken battleship consists of three main sections: the entry and assembly rooms; a central area designed for ceremonies and general observation; and the shrine room, where the names of those killed on the Arizona are engraved on the marble wall.

The USS Arizona Memorial grew out of wartime desire to establish some sort of memorial at Pearl Harbor to honor those who died in the attack. Suggestions for such a memorial began in 1943, but it wasn’t until 1949, when the Territory of Hawaii established the Pacific War Memorial Commission, that the first real steps were taken to bring it about.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who helped achieve Allied victory in Europe during World War II, approved the creation of the Memorial in 1958. Its construction was completed in 1961 with public funds appropriated by Congress and private donations. The Memorial was dedicated in 1962.

Source: http://www.nps.gov/valr/historyculture/index.htm

Mount Rushmore, Black Hills, Mt Rushmore National Memorial Park

Mount Rushmore, Black Hills, Mt Rushmore National Memorial Park

Mount Rushmore
13000 Hwy 244 #81
Keystone, SD 57751
(605) 574-2523

Mount Rushmore

Once Doane Robinson and others had found a sculptor, Gutzon Borglum, they had to get permission to do the carving. Senator Peter Norbeck and Congressman William Williamson were instrumental in getting the legislation passed to allow the carving. Williamson drafted two bills, one each, to be introduced to Congress and the State Legislature. The bill requesting permission to use Federal land for the monument was easily passed. The bill sent to the State of South Dakota was not going to be so easy. The Mount Harney National Memorial bill was defeated twice and almost a third time when on March 5, 1925 Governor Gunderson signed the bill. The Mount Harney Memorial Association was established by the Governor later that summer.

Early in the project money was hard to find despite Borglum’s promise eastern businessmen would gladly make large donations. He also promised the people of South Dakota they would not be responsible for paying for any of the mountain carving. In the summer of 1927, President Calvin Coolidge was in the Black Hills, and Borglum was planning a formal dedication of the mountain. Borglum hired a plane to fly over the State Game Lodge in Custer State Park where Coolidge was staying. As he flew by Borglum dropped a wreath to invite the President to the dedication ceremony. Fortunately Coolidge agreed to attend. On August 10, 1927 Mount Rushmore was formally dedicated. At the dedication ceremony President Coolidge gave a speech and promised federal funding for the project.

For the final two years of the project Lincoln, Borglum’s son, was in charge while Gutzon was constantly trying to get more money for the project. In March of 1941, as a final dedication was being planned, Gutzon Borglum died. With the artist gone and the impending involvement of America in World War II, finishing work on Mount Rushmore drew to a close. On October 31, 1941 the monument was declared complete.

Receiving permission to do the carving, finding funding and managing personalities were all a part of the challenge to establish Mount Rushmore National Memorial. At times it seemed harder to keep the project going than it was to do the colossal carving of the four presidents. In the end, cooler heads, charm, and determination saw the memorial through to the end. Mount Rushmore National Memorial has become a great icon of American history.

Source: http://www.nps.gov/moru/historyculture/mount-rushmore-national-memorial.htm

Kittyhawk, NC, Wright Brothers First Flight – 1903

Kittyhawk, NC, Wright Brothers First Flight – 1903

800 W Kitty Hawk Rd
Kitty Hawk, NC 27949

Alternative Wright Brothers First Flight 1903 Video

Wright Brothers Kittyhawk NC Memorial

On December 17, 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright (Wright Brothers) flew the first successful airplane. The first flight, by Orville, was 120 feet (37 m) in 12 seconds. The next two flights covered approximately 175 feet (53 m) and 200 feet (61 m), by Wilbur and Orville respectively.

The Wright Brothers, in 1903, were the first to fly an airplane. This is just one example of many inventions developed during the Industrial Revolution.

Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty

The Statue Of Liberty‎
Liberty Island
New York, NY 10004
(212) 363-3200

Building Statue of Liberty

The story of the Statue of Liberty is a story of change. The people of France gave the Statue to the people of the United States over one hundred years ago in recognition of a friendship established during the American Revolution. Over the years, the meanings of the Statue have grown until she has become an international icon of freedom and liberty, the most recognizable symbol of democracy in the world.

The idea of the Statue originated around 1865 with Edouard de Laboulaye who saw the United States as a country that had proved that democracy was a viable type of government- after all they had just survived a Civil War and abolished slavery. De Laboulaye also saw the gift as a way to reflect his wish for a democracy in France. Artist Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi, who was known for large-scale work, was commissioned to design this sculpture. Nothing happened for some time, but finally (in 1874) Bartholdi came to the United States to look for a location for his monument. He saw Bedloe’s Island from his ship as he sailed into the New York Harbor, and realized it would be a perfect location – since here his statue would always have an audience.

Since the Statue was a joint effort between American and France, it was agreed that the American people were to build the pedestal, and the French people were responsible for the Statue and assembly.

The Statue was completed in France in July of 1884, then disassembled and shipped to the United States. She arrived in NY In June 1885. Once the pedestal was finished, the statue was re-assembled in four months. On October 28, 1886 the dedication of the Statue of Liberty took place in front of thousands of spectators.

In May of 1982, in anticipation of the Statue’s 100th birthday a restoration project was initiated. At the start of the Statue’s restoration, the United Nations in 1984 designated the Statue of Liberty as a World Heritage Site. The newly restored Statue opened to the public on July 5, 1986 during Liberty Weekend, which celebrated her centennial.

Source: http://www.nps.gov/stli/historyculture/index.htm

As Seen/Heard On:
Fox News Logo   CBS News Logo   The Huffington Post Logo
BLOG COMMENTS
  • IM Forum: Simply wanna comment on few general things, The website style is perfect, the subject material is rattling excellent....
  • Beatrice: Fantastic. I agree.
  • Offshore Company: Fantastic.. Thank you for your information on the post What to Do With Teenagers: 10 Things to Help Me with My Teenager...
American Pride, United States History Personal Study Guide, America Youth, American Patriotism, Patriotic America, How to Be Successful in the USA, Success Stories in America, American Patriotic Book, What is BEST for America?, Is Anybody Listening?, Duplicitous, Randy E King

Hurricane Storm Shutters Fort Lauderdale Florida Blinds, Shutters, Shades, Window Treatments Fort Lauderdale Commercial Real Estate Property Appraiser Anaheim – Collins and Associates Christian Party Supplies and Event Planning Indianapolis Our Place Childcare Indianapolis