Global War on Terror Timeline – 1973-Current

American Patriotism Success in America Logo
American Pride Logo George Washington Crossing Delaware Freedom Vets Day Veterans Day November 2009 The Alamo San Antonio Texas Rough Riders San Juan Hill Roosevelt Reagan Bush Gorbachev Statue of Liberty
  • Yahoo Answers Logo
  • Facebook Logo
  • Twitter Logo
  • Youtube Logo
StoriesofUSA@gmail.com

"We commend you for your efforts to develop and improve access to high-quality history education resources that will
enhance the teaching and learning of history in schools across this nation"
- US Department of Education

  • American Patriotism Stories of USA Home Icon
  • Abraham Lincoln Icon
  • Liberty Bell Icon
  • US Flag American Patriotism Icon
  • Dream 2 Achieve Children Success
  • Success in America
  • Behind the Red, White and Blue Icon
HELP PRESERVE
AMERICA'S HERITAGE
Donate Now Button


RANDY E KING BIO
BEST-SELLING AUTHOR


Book Now Best Public Speaker Randy E King "History can show us where we do or do not want to go."


Dream 2 Achieve
Available August 2016


Dream 2 Achieve Book Cover
"Leadership is about standing out from the masses while being an example for them."


Leading America
Published June 2015


Leading America Book Cover
"Authentic leaders are given what they deserve by others through selfless acts."


Duplicitous
Published August 2014


Duplicitous Book Cover
"Our true enemy is ignorance & apathy."


IS ANYBODY LISTENING?
Real Teens - True Stories


Is Anybody Listening Book Cover "Raising teenagers is like trying to nail Jell-O to a tree."




Left Center Right What is Best for America Book Cover "He who knows nothing is closer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors."


BUY AMERICAN PRIDE CD
American Pride CD mp3 Digital Download
HOME | US HISTORY | HISTORY ICONS | PATRIOTIC | DREAM2ACHIEVE | SUCCESS | MISC

Global War on Terror Timeline – 1973-Current

Global War on Terror Timeline – 1973-Current

** Warning – Parental Discretion Advised **

These videos follow YouTube guidelines. However, there are visual displays of war and acts of violence.

Alternative Afghanistan Election Vote for Government Video

Alternative Saddam Hussein Statue Live Video

Al Qaeda Islamist War on Terror

Major Events on War on Terror:

March 2, 1973: Ambassador to Sudan Assassinated (U.S. Ambassador to Sudan Cleo A. Noel and other diplomats were assassinated at the Saudi Arabian Embassy in Khartoum by members of the Black September organization.)

December 17, 1973: Attack and Hijacking at the Rome Airport (Five terrorists pulled weapons from their luggage in the terminal lounge at the Rome airport, killing two persons. They then attacked Pan American 707 bound for Beirut and Tehran, destroying it with incendiary grenades and killing 29 persons. They then herded 5 Italian hostages into a Lufthansa airliner and killed an Italian customs agent as he tried to escape, after which they forced the pilot to fly to Beirut. After Lebanese authorities refused to let the plane land, it landed in Athens, where the terrorists demanded the release of 2 Arab terrorists. In order to make Greek authorities comply with their demands, the terrorists killed a hostage and threw his body onto the tarmac. The plane then flew to Damascus, where it stopped for two hours to obtain fuel and food. It then flew to Kuwait, where the terrorists released their hostages in return for passage to an unknown destination. The Palestine Liberation Organization disavowed the attack, and no group claimed responsibility for it.)

February 14, 1979: Ambassador to Afghanistan Assassinated (Four Afghans kidnapped U.S. Ambassador Adolph Dubs in Kabul and demanded the release of various “religious figures.” Dubs was killed, along with four alleged terrorists, when Afghan police stormed the hotel room where he was being held.)

November 4, 1979: Iran Hostage Crisis (After President Carter agreed to admit the Shah of Iran into the US, Iranian radicals seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and took 66 American diplomats hostage. 13 hostages were soon released, but the remaining 53 were held until their release on January 20, 1981.)

October 6, 1981: Assassination of Egyptian President (Soldiers who were secretly members of the Takfir Wal-Hajira sect attacked and killed Egyptian President Anwar Sadat during a troop review.)

April 18, 1983: Bombing of U.S. Embassy in Beirut (63 people, including the CIA’s Middle East director, were killed and 120 were injured in a 400-pound suicide truck-bomb attack on the U.S. Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon. The Islamic Jihad claimed responsibility.)

October 23, 1983: Bombing of Marine Barracks, Beirut (Simultaneous suicide truck-bomb attacks were made on American and French compounds in Beirut, Lebanon. A 12,000-pound bomb destroyed the U.S. compound, killing 242 Americans, while 58 French troops were killed when a 400-pound device destroyed a French base. Islamic Jihad claimed responsibility.)

March 16, 1984: Kidnapping of Embassy Official (The Islamic Jihad kidnapped and later murdered Political Officer William Buckley in Beirut, Lebanon. Other U.S. citizens not connected to the U.S. government were seized over a succeeding two-year period.)

June 14, 1985: TWA Hijacking (A Trans-World Airlines flight was hijacked en route to Rome from Athens by two Lebanese Hezbollah terrorists and forced to fly to Beirut. The eight crew members and 145 passengers were held for seventeen days, during which one American hostage, a U.S. Navy sailor, was murdered. After being flown twice to Algiers, the aircraft was returned to Beirut after Israel released 435 Lebanese and Palestinian prisoners.)

October 7, 1985: Achille Lauro Hijacking (4 Palestinian Liberation Front terrorists seized the Italian cruise liner in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, taking more than 700 hostages. One U.S. passenger was murdered before the Egyptian government offered the terrorists safe haven in return for the hostages’ freedom.)

November 23, 1985: Egyptian Airliner Hijacking (An EgyptAir airplane bound from Athens to Malta and carrying several U.S. citizens was hijacked by the Abu Nidal Group.)

December 27, 1985: Airport Attacks in Rome and Vienna (4 gunmen belonging to the Abu Nidal Organization attacked the El Al and Trans World Airlines ticket counters at Rome’s Leonardo da Vinci Airport with grenades and automatic rifles. Thirteen persons were killed and 75 were wounded before Italian police and Israeli security guards killed three of the gunmen and captured the fourth. Three more Abu Nidal gunmen attacked the El Al ticket counter at Vienna’s Schwechat Airport, killing three persons and wounding 30. Austrian police killed one of the gunmen and captured the others.)

March 30, 1986: Aircraft Bombing in Greece (A Palestinian splinter group detonated a bomb as TWA Flight 840 approached Athens airport, killing four U.S. citizens.)

April 5, 1986: Berlin Discothèque Bombing (2 U.S. soldiers were killed and 79 American servicemen were injured in a Libyan bomb attack on a nightclub in West Berlin, West Germany. In retaliation U.S. military jets bombed targets in and around Tripoli and Benghazi.)

February 17, 1988: Kidnapping of William Higgins (U.S. Marine Corps Lieutenant Colonel W. Higgins was kidnapped and murdered by the Iranian-backed Hezbollah group while serving with the United Nations Truce Supervisory Organization (UNTSO) in southern Lebanon.)

April 14, 1988: Naples USO Attack (The Organization of Jihad Brigades exploded a car-bomb outside a USO Club in Naples, Italy, killing one U.S. sailor.)

December 21, 1988: Pan Am 103 Bombing (Pan American Airlines Flight 103 was blown up over Lockerbie, Scotland, by a bomb believed to have been placed on the aircraft by Libyan terrorists in Frankfurt, West Germany. All 259 people on board were killed.)

January 18-19, 1991: Attempted Iraqi Attacks on U.S. Posts (Iraqi agents planted bombs at the U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia’s home residence and at the United States Information Service (USIS) library in Manila.)

February 26, 1993: World Trade Center Bombing (The World Trade Center in New York City was badly damaged when a car bomb planted by Islamic terrorists exploded in an underground garage. The bomb left 6 people dead and 1,000 injured. The men carrying out the attack were followers of Umar Abd al-Rahman, an Egyptian cleric who preached in the New York City area.)

April 14, 1993: Attempted Assassination of President Bush by Iraqi Agents (The Iraqi intelligence service attempted to assassinate former U.S. President George Bush during a visit to Kuwait. In retaliation, the U.S. launched a cruise missile attack 2 months later on the Iraqi capital Baghdad.)

February 25, 1994: Hebron Massacre (Jewish right-wing extremist and U.S. citizen Baruch Goldstein machine-gunned Moslem worshippers at a mosque in West Bank town of Hebron, killing 29 and wounding about 150.)

March 8, 1995: Attack on U.S. Diplomats in Pakistan (2 unidentified gunmen killed two U.S. diplomats and wounded a third in Karachi, Pakistan.)

April 19, 1995: Bombing of the Federal Building in Oklahoma City (Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols destroyed the Federal Building in Oklahoma City with a massive truck bomb that killed 166 and injured hundreds more in what was up to then the largest terrorist attack on American soil.)

July 4, 1995: Kashmiri Hostage-taking (In India six foreigners, including two U.S. citizens, were taken hostage by Al-Faran, a Kashmiri separatist group. One non-U.S. hostage was later found beheaded.)

August 21, 1995: Jerusalem Bus Attack (HAMAS claimed responsibility for the detonation of a bomb that killed 6 and injured over 100 persons, including several U.S. citizens.)

November 13, 1995: Saudi Military Installation Attack (The Islamic Movement of Change planted a bomb in a Riyadh military compound that killed one U.S. citizen, several foreign national employees of the U.S. government, and over 40 others.)

February 26, 1996: HAMAS Bus Attack (In Jerusalem, a suicide bomber blew up a bus, killing 26 persons, including three U.S. citizens, and injuring some 80 persons, including three other US citizens.)

March 4, 1996: Dizengoff Center Bombing (HAMAS and the Palestine Islamic Jihad (PIJ) both claimed responsibility for a bombing outside of Tel Aviv’s largest shopping mall that killed 20 persons and injured 75 others, including 2 U.S. citizens.)

May 13, 1996: West Bank Attack (Arab gunmen opened fire on a bus and a group of Yeshiva students near the Bet El settlement, killing a dual U.S./Israeli citizen and wounding three Israelis. No one claimed responsibility for the attack, but HAMAS was suspected.)

June 9, 1996: Zekharya Attack (Unidentified gunmen opened fire on a car near Zekharya, killing a dual U.S./Israeli citizen and an Israeli. The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) was suspected.)

June 25, 1996: Khobar Towers Bombing (A fuel truck carrying a bomb exploded outside the US military’s Khobar Towers housing facility in Dhahran, killing 19 U.S. military personnel and wounding 515 persons, including 240 U.S. personnel. Several groups claimed responsibility for the attack.)

August 17, 1996: Sudanese Rebel Kidnapping (Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) rebels kidnapped six missionaries in Mapourdit, including a U.S. citizen, an Italian, three Australians, and a Sudanese. The SPLA released the hostages 11 days later.)

September 13, 1996: PUK Kidnapping (In Iraq, Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) militants kidnapped four French workers for Pharmaciens Sans Frontieres, a Canadian United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) official, and two Iraqis.)

December 3, 1996: Paris Subway Explosion (A bomb exploded aboard a Paris subway train as it arrived at the Port Royal station, killing two French nationals, a Moroccan, and a Canadian, and injuring 86 persons. Among those injured were one U.S. citizen and a Canadian. No one claimed responsibility for the attack, but Algerian extremists are suspected.)

November 1, 1996: Red Cross Worker Kidnappings (In Sudan a breakaway group from the Sudanese People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) kidnapped three International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) workers, including a U.S. citizen, an Australian, and a Kenyan. On 9 December the rebels released the hostages in exchange for ICRC supplies and a health survey for their camp.)

December 3, 1996: Paris Subway Explosion (A bomb exploded aboard a Paris subway train as it arrived at the Port Royal station, killing two French nationals, a Moroccan, and a Canadian, and injuring 86 persons. Among those injured were one U.S. citizen and a Canadian. No one claimed responsibility for the attack, but Algerian extremists are suspected.)

January 2-13, 1997: Egyptian Letter Bombs (A series of letter bombs with Alexandria, Egypt, postmarks were discovered at Al-Hayat newspaper bureaus in Washington, New York City, London, and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Three similar devices, also postmarked in Egypt, were found at a prison facility in Leavenworth, Kansas. Bomb disposal experts defused all the devices, but one detonated at the Al-Hayat office in London, injuring two security guards and causing minor damage.)

February 23, 1997: Empire State Building Sniper Attack (A Palestinian gunman opened fire on tourists at an observation deck atop the Empire State Building in New York City, killing a Danish national and wounding visitors from the United States, Argentina, Switzerland, and France before turning the gun on himself. A handwritten note carried by the gunman claimed this was a punishment attack against the “enemies of Palestine.”)

September 4, 1997: Israeli Shopping Mall Bombing (3 suicide bombers of HAMAS detonated bombs in the Ben Yehuda shopping mall in Jerusalem, killing eight persons, including the bombers, and wounding nearly 200 others. A dual U.S./Israeli citizen was among the dead, and 7 U.S. citizens were wounded.)

October 30, 1997: Yemeni Kidnappings (Al-Sha’if tribesmen kidnapped a U.S. businessman near Sanaa. The tribesmen sought the release of two fellow tribesmen who were arrested on smuggling charges and several public works projects they claim the government promised them. They released the hostage on November 27.)

November 12, 1997: Murder of U.S. Businessmen in Pakistan (Two unidentified gunmen shot to death four U.S. auditors from Union Texas Petroleum Corporation and their Pakistani driver after they drove away from the Sheraton Hotel in Karachi. The Islami Inqilabi Council, or Islamic Revolutionary Council, claimed responsibility in a call to the U.S. Consulate in Karachi. In a letter to Pakistani newspapers, the Aimal Khufia Action Committee also claimed responsibility.)

April 15, 1998: Somali Hostage-takings (Somali militiamen abducted nine Red Cross and Red Crescent workers at an airstrip north of Mogadishu. The hostages included a U.S. citizen, a German, a Belgian, a French, a Norwegian, two Swiss, and one Somali. The gunmen were members of a sub-clan loyal to Ali Mahdi Mohammed, who controlled the northern section of the capital.)

August 7, 1998: U.S. Embassy Bombings in East Africa (A bomb exploded at the rear entrance of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya, killing 12 U.S. citizens, 32 Foreign Service Nationals (FSNs), and 247 Kenyan citizens. Approximately 5,000 Kenyans, 6 U.S. citizens, and 13 FSNs were injured. The U.S. Embassy building sustained extensive structural damage. Almost simultaneously, a bomb detonated outside the U.S. Embassy in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, killing 7 FSNs and 3 Tanzanian citizens, and injuring 1 U.S. citizen and 76 Tanzanians. The explosion caused major structural damage to the U.S. Embassy facility. The U.S. Government held Osama Bin Laden responsible.)

January 2, 1999: Angolan Aircraft Downing (A UN plane carrying one U.S. citizen, four Angolans, two Philippine nationals and one Namibian was shot down, according to a UN official. No deaths or injuries were reported. Angolan authorities blamed the attack on National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) rebels. UNITA officials denied shooting down the plane.)

August 12, 2000: Kidnappings in Kyrgyzstan (In the Kara-Su Valley, the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan took four U.S. citizens hostage. The Americans escaped on August 12.)

October 1, 2000: Church Bombing in Tajikistan (Unidentified militants detonated two bombs in a Christian church in Dushanbe, killing seven persons and injuring 70 others. The church was founded by a Korean-born U.S. citizen, and most of those killed and wounded were Korean. No one claimed responsibility.)

October 12, 2000: Attack on U.S.S. Cole (In Aden, Yemen, a small dingy carrying explosives rammed the destroyer U.S.S. Cole, killing 17 sailors and injuring 39 others. Supporters of Osama Bin Laden were suspected.)

December 30, 2000: Manila Bombing (A bomb exploded in a plaza across the street from the U.S. Embassy in Manila, injuring nine persons. The Moro Islamic Liberation Front was likely responsible.)

May 27, 2001: Philippines Hostage Incident (Muslim Abu Sayyaf guerrillas seized 13 tourists and 3 staff members at a resort on Palawan Island and took their captives to Basilan Island. The captives included three U.S. citizens: Guellermo Sobero and missionaries Martin and Gracia Burnham. Philippine troops fought a series of battles with the guerrillas between June 1 and June 3 during which 9 hostages escaped and two were found dead. The guerrillas took additional hostages when they seized the hospital in the town of Lamitan. On June 12, Abu Sayyaf spokesman Abu Sabaya claimed that Sobero had been killed and beheaded; his body was found in October. The Burnhams remained in captivity until June 2002.)

September 11, 2001: Terrorist Attacks on U.S. Homeland (Two hijacked airliners crashed into the twin towers of the World Trade Center. Soon thereafter, the Pentagon was struck by a third hijacked plane. A fourth hijacked plane, suspected to be bound for a high-profile target in Washington, crashed into a field in southern Pennsylvania. The attacks killed 3,025 U.S. citizens and other nationals. President Bush and Cabinet officials indicated that Usama Bin Laden was the prime suspect and that they considered the United States in a state of war with international terrorism. In the aftermath of the attacks, the United States formed the Global Coalition Against Terrorism.)

October 7, 2001: US attacks Taliban in Afghanistan (US declares war on terrorism and attacks Afghanistan due to its assistance with known terrorists, such as Osama bin Laden)

March 19, 2003: US attacks Iraq (US opens second front on War on Terror into Iraq because Iraq is host to known terrorists.)

November 5, 2006: Saddam Hussein was found guilty of crimes against humanity and sentenced to death by hanging by the newly established Iraqi government.

December 30, 2006: Saddam was hanged.

May 1, 2011: Osama bin Laden killed by US military near Islamabad, Pakistan.

The fight continues with both side still taking loses…

Source: http://www.army.mil/terrorism/

As Seen/Heard On:
Fox News Logo   CBS News Logo   The Huffington Post Logo
BLOG COMMENTS
  • IM Forum: Simply wanna comment on few general things, The website style is perfect, the subject material is rattling excellent....
  • Beatrice: Fantastic. I agree.
  • Offshore Company: Fantastic.. Thank you for your information on the post What to Do With Teenagers: 10 Things to Help Me with My Teenager...
American Pride, United States History Personal Study Guide, America Youth, American Patriotism, Patriotic America, How to Be Successful in the USA, Success Stories in America, American Patriotic Book, What is BEST for America?, Is Anybody Listening?, Duplicitous, Randy E King

Hurricane Storm Shutters Fort Lauderdale Florida Blinds, Shutters, Shades, Window Treatments Fort Lauderdale Commercial Real Estate Property Appraiser Anaheim – Collins and Associates Christian Party Supplies and Event Planning Indianapolis Dog Walking La Habra