4 Times Throughout History That America Failed

To understand why America works, we have to reflect on the bad times as much as the good times. You don’t become one of the youngest, most freedom-loving and traversable nations, and most influential countries in the world without making mistakes. More than that, to brush these mistakes under the rug is also a recipe for repeating the same or worse failures in the future.

So with that understanding, the United States of America hasn’t always been perfect. There have been many, many times in the past when America failed its people and the world. Even today, there are failures. Finding a better way forward with these lessons in tow will make us stronger and better people.

Let’s take a walk down memory lane and jog up our memories remembering when throughout history has America failed.

Hiroshima and Nagasaki 

1945, the year when America bombed not one but two of Japan’s hugely populated cities in World War II. The first attack happened on Monday, August 6, 1945, in Hiroshima, which killed approximately 80,000 people, but the casualties were counted to be more than that. The second bomb targeted Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. This, too, was responsible for taking 40,000 lives. But that’s just the number of people who died in the bomb attack; radiation and other lingering after-effects resulted in even higher numbers.

The Great Depression 

Before World War 2, the country faced a considerable fall in the stock market coupled with droughts throughout the midwest, which hit construction, commercial and industrial sectors, farmers, and so many more people. Unemployment rates rose to between 22% and 25%. Even parts of the country that were known for their wealth were severely affected. 

Vietnam Invasion

In 1960, the United States of America invaded the south side of Vietnam to try and control the rise of communism in the country. The war began in the early 1950s, but was prolonged through to the 1970s. Today, there remain lingering questions about the need for America to invade and to engage in a war that resulted in an estimated 3 to 4 million Vietnamese people dying. 

Internment Camps

During World War II, amid growing fears of spies from Japan inside of the United States, the U.S. government began rounding up thousands of Japanese-American citizens along the west coast and placing them into internment camps for the duration of the war. In total, more than 100,000 ethnic Japanese people were held, with 62% being American-born, second or third-generation Japanese Americans, and, therefore, American citizens. 
Understanding our past is crucial to making better decisions in the future. The same can be said for your health. Support your brain, memory, focus, and overall cognition with supplements from brands like Banyan Botanicals, Innovative CBD, and Charlottes Web.