The Federalist Papers: Federalism Essays

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The Federalist Papers: Federalism Essays

The Federalist Papers: Federalism Essays, US Constitution, Bill of Rights

The Importance of the Union (1-14)

The Federalist Paper No. 1: General Introduction – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 2: Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence – John Jay
The Federalist Paper No. 3: Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence (con’t) – John Jay
The Federalist Paper No. 4: Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence (con’t) – John Jay
The Federalist Paper No. 5: Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence (con’t) – John Jay
The Federalist Paper No. 6: Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 7: Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 8: The Consequences of Hostilities Between the States – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 9: The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 10: The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection (con’t) – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 11: The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 12: The Utility of the Union In Respect to Revenue – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 13: Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 14: Objections to the Proposed Constitution From Extent of Territory Answered – James Madison

Defects of the Articles of Confederation (15-22)

The Federalist Paper No. 15: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 16: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 17: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 18: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton, James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 19: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton, James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 20: The Insufficiency fo the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton, James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 21: Other Defects of the Present Confederation – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 22: Other Defects of the Present Confederation (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton

Arguments for the Type of Government Contained in the Constitution (23-36)

The Federalist Paper No. 23: The Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 24: The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 25: The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 26: The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 27: The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 28: The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 29: Concerning the Militia – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 30: Concerning the General Power of Taxation – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 31: Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 32: Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 33: Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 34: Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 35: Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 36: Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton

The Republican Form of Government (37-51)

The Federalist Paper No. 37: Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 38: The Same Subject Continued, and the Incoherence of the Objections to the New Plan Exposed – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 39: The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 40: The Powers of the Convention to Form a Mixed Government Examined and Sustained – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 41: General View of the Powers Conferred by The Constitution – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 42: The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 43: The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered (con’t) – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 44: Restrictions on the Authority of the Several States – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 45: The Alleged Danger From the Powers of the Union to the State Governments Considered – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 46: The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 47: The Particular Structure of the New Government and the Distribution of Power Among Its Different Parts – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 48: These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control Over Each Other – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 49: Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government by Appealing to the People Through a Convention – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 50: Periodical Appeals to the People Considered – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 51: The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison

The Legislative Branch (52-66)

The Federalist Paper No. 52: The House of Representatives – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 53: The House of Representatives (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 54: The Apportionment of Members Among the States – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 55: The Total Number of the House of Representatives – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 56: The Total Number of the House of Representatives (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 57: The Alleged Tendency of the New Plan to Elevate the Few at the Expense of the Many Considered in Connection with Representation – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 58: Objection That The Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands Considered – James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 59: Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 60: Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 61: Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 62: The Senate – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 63: The Senate (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
The Federalist Paper No. 64: The Powers of the Senate – John Jay
The Federalist Paper No. 65: The Powers of the Senate (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 66: Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered – Alexander Hamilton

The Executive Branch (67-77)

The Federalist Paper No. 67: The Executive Department – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 68: The Mode of Electing the President – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 69: The Real Character of the Executive – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 70: The Executive Department Further Considered – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 71: The Duration in Office of the Executive – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 72: The Same Subject Continued, and Re-Eligibility of the Executive Considered – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 73: The Provision For The Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 74: The Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and the Pardoning Power of the Executive – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 75: The Treaty-Making Power of the Executive – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 76: The Appointing Power of the Executive – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 77: The Appointing Power Continued and Other Powers of the Executive Considered – Alexander Hamilton

The Judicial Branch (78-83)

The Federalist Paper No. 78: The Judiciary Department – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 79: The Judiciary (con’t) – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 80: The Powers of the Judiciary – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 81: The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 82: The Judiciary Continued – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 83: The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury – Alexander Hamilton

Conclusions and Miscellaneous Ideas

The Federalist Paper No. 84: Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered – Alexander Hamilton
The Federalist Paper No. 85: Concluding Remarks – Alexander Hamilton

One Response to “The Federalist Papers: Federalism Essays”

  • Zoltan says:

    . . . was the sedition act, by the stdnaards of 18th and 19th century and even early 20th century jurisprudence, really a violation of the first amendment?I’m thinking specifically, if I recall correctly, of the fact that under the law, sedition was illegal only if the seditious statement was “false.” My point is that although by most stdnaards, especially mine, sedition acts are unconscionable, they might not have been beyond the pale in 1790s US.I just happen to be reading the section of Gordon Wood’s Empire of Liberty on the Federalists passing a law on sedition. The below are summarized points from that book, pages 256 262.Common law of the time didn’t require sedition to be false for a defendant to lose. In fact sedition based on a true rendering of the facts was considered an aggravating factor. This perspective was weakened in a case in New York in 1735 but never fully eradicated when Congress passed their prohibition against sedition and Adams signed it into law.Some courts were so eager for the sedition law to pass that once it became debated in Congress they began convicting publishers prior to its passage.Libel in this period caused far more serious damage then now because law enforcement was mostly and effectively non-existent. So elected official’s authority to rule came from the ongoing support of the people, and that authority was effectively compromised when partisan newspapers were able to run with stories that resonated with the people. It should also be noted that the press of the time was far more partisan than they are today and are far more willing to libel their partisan opponents, think Glenn Beck and Rush Limbaugh as the stdnaards not the exception. This isn’t a defense of the Federalist’s Sedition Act but instead my arguing we need to analyze the Act within the framework of the times rather than our own.ppnl stated:Even the founders were guilty. Consider Hamilton’s objection in light of the fact that freedom of the press is explicitly guarantied, there is no explicit power granted to government to infringe the liberty of the press and yet they saw fit to pass the aliens and sedition act.I used the same source and Ron Chernow’s biography of Hamilton (paperback, pages 570 and 572-3 for the following.Both historians note that Hamilton objected to rushing the bill through . Chernow also notes that Hamilton also saw elements of the Act he found objectionable to the point of being tyrannical . However Chernow has Hamilton accepting the act upon passage and advocating its use in some cases. Again some perspective; many of the newspaper publishers were not Americans and yet were here advocating for the cause of the French in a way that Federalists believed was traitorous to a new nation not yet confident it could independently exist. We look back and history teaches us to defend those principles, they had no such benchmark to use as a lesson learned while existing in far more tenuous times. The seditious and libelous acts of republican newspapers risked society itself sinking into anarchy; vandalism against newspaper buildings was common and a brawl in Congress with one member caning another buttressed this perspective. Of course from the other side and in our hindsight the Federalists appeared much like the conservatives* of today attempting to keep the Mexicans out, especially when it came Irish immigrants who were disproportionately pro-French rather than favoring the Brits like the Federalists.*I’m not claiming the Federalists were conservatives or the legacy of today’s movement. I closely identify far more with the Federalists and see some but not a whole bunch in their positions that compare to today’s conservative movement. E.g., A. Hamilton was about as progressive in mindset and policy prescriptions as one could get where his primary enabler was George Washington. Progressive in the sense of believing government has a critical role to play in an economy and one should leverage it even if it violated classically liberal ideals.

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