Tag: medical innovations

Medical Innovations Created by Americans

The United States is coming close to its 250th birthday celebration. One of the unique emphasis points in the American economy has been the emphasis on medicine. Since its founding, thousands of unique innovations have come from the pharmaceutical, education, and innovation found in this country.

Many U.S. researchers have helped to advance the study of nutrition. The principles discovered by American innovation trickle into several areas of science, ranging from supplements to surgical techniques.

If you take products from brands like Quicksilver Scientific, Irwin Naturals, or Enzymedica, you are benefitting (at least in part) from the American investment emphasis in medicine.

Here is a partial list of what U.S. research has given the world since 1900.

The United States Created the Public Health Service in 1902

Although Americans rely on a patchwork platform of insurance, in-network providers, and confusing medical access rules, the U.S. was an early adopter of a national emphasis on better care.

The United States was at the forefront of longer average lifespans for several decades during the 20th century.

Austrian-American Karl Landsteiner developed the system of blood typing in 1901. We still use the A, B, and O method today. The first successful transfusion happened in 1907 because of this work.

During the 1920s, Americans introduced numerous vaccines to global medicine, including diphtheria, whooping cough, tuberculosis, and tetanus. In 1922, U.S. doctors because the first to successfully treat diabetes by using insulin.

The first dose of penicillin given to a patient in the U.S. happened in 1942 to treat a case of septicemia. By 1943, over 400 million units were produced. Americans brought that number to 20.5 billion doses before the end of the second world war.

The 1960s and 70s were another time of vaccine innovation in the United States. Options to fight mumps, rubella, chicken pox, pneumonia, and meningitis were developed during this time.

The 21st Century Brought More American Innovation

Medical innovations shifted from reactive to proactive treatment in the 21st century. That transition started when scientists released the rough draft of the human genome to the public. Doctors could see what all 23,000 genes in the human body could do.

That information led to the development of using human skin cells to create embryonic ones for future medical treatments.

As the 21st century continues, new treatments for cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and other severe health issues are on the horizon. Today, we all have the option to live happy and healthy lives due to the ingenuitive spirit of American medicine.